The Critical Link Between Healthy Thyroid Function and Iodine

Background on Iodine Use

For many years, there has been an unfounded fear surrounding iodine and iodine supplementation. Emerging science is acknowledging the value of iodine. Research has actually confirmed that boosting iodine consumption may improve thyroid health, lower incidence of breast/prostate cancers and fibrocystic breast disease as well as promote overall well-being.

There was a time when iodine was considered a “cure-all”. Before the widespread use of synthetic drugs, iodine was recommended for everything from healing wounds and disease to destroying viruses, bacteria and even resolving cancer. With the advent of “The Age of Pharmaceuticals”, iodine has relegated to the dark side –as another supplement to be feared because anything more than minute amounts “might not be safe”.  

In the late 1920’s, the increasing incidence of goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland) caused the medical/governmental community to consider the iodine/thyroid connection. The decision was made to have iodine added to common table salt --which is still on the grocery store shelf today as “Iodized Salt”. Even though this added only small amounts of iodine to the daily intake, rejection of iodine took hold in the 1940’s as the result of one poorly documented paper. It branded iodine as “archaic and unnecessary” despite the volume of information regarding traditional use.

The impact of this unfortunate propaganda caused people to believe they had minimal need for iodine and that it could even be potentially dangerous. By the 1950’s, modern drugs were being promoted as the “real” answer to thyroid concerns.

How Much Iodine is Really Needed?

As for the amount of iodine needed, unfortunate misinformation still exists due to the US government RDA’s (Recommended Daily Allowance) inaccuracies which indicate 150 micrograms (mcg) of iodine. Prior to the late 1930’s, physicians routinely prescribed 37,000 mcg or more per day, depending on the disorder.

 

In Japan, people consume more than 12,000 mcg per day –an amount 50 times more than the average American. Japanese life expectancy is 83 years while it’s only 78 years in the US. Death from breast cancer in the US is three times higher than it is for women in Japan who also have much lower rates of thyroid illness. When Japanese women move to the US and begin eating the American diet, their rates of breast cancer and thyroid disease increase dramatically.

So What Does the Thyroid Do?

The thyroid regulates the entire metabolic function throughout the body. Any dysfunction of the thyroid can have a major impact. This includes how much weight a person carries and the ability to regulate body weight. Additionally, thyroid dysfunction may contribute to skin disorders, irregular heartbeat, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, muscle dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, mental confusion, severe depression, decreased libido, extreme fatigue and apathy. Disruptions to the health of the thyroid may even significantly alter the personality, hinder one’s ability to enjoy life, lead to anxiety and precipitate anti-social behavior.

It’s amazing to realize that aside from the thyroid gland’s need for iodine, EVERY cell in the body has a receptor site for iodine. Iodine is especially critical for the health of breast, prostate, ovary and uterine tissue.

Dr. David Brownstein, M.D., an author and thyroid expert, has treated thousands of patients in his clinic and states: “As I started to use larger amounts of iodine (12,000 to 50,000 mcg/day) to achieve whole body sufficiency, I began to see positive results in my patients. Goiters and nodules of the thyroid shrank, cysts on the ovaries became smaller and began to disappear, patients reported increased energy, and metabolism was increased as evidenced by my patients having new success in losing weight. Libido improved in men and women. People suffering from brain fog reported a clearing of the fogginess. Patients reported sleeping better. Most importantly, those with chronic illnesses that were having a difficult time improving began to notice many of their symptoms resolving.”

Iodine is most effective when supplemented in a combination of three forms, molecular iodine, sodium iodide and potassium iodide. The best food sources of iodine are seaweed (iodine content varies) and other seafood, such as cod and shrimp, which is much of the reason why iodine levels are much healthier in traditional Asian diets. Some iodine is also supplied by whole dairy and eggs. Very small amounts can also be found in some grains.


Sources:

TerryTalksNutrition.com
Mercola.com
Life Extension Foundation
Clinical Research Studies, GreenMed.com

 


Author

Megan is our product curator and store visionary. Personally vetting every product that comes through the door, she evaluates thousands of items each month with a focus on quality ingredients and value. Well-schooled in the supplements department and the editor of our in-store newsletters, she still insists her main job is raising three daughters! (Wichita, Kansas)

Megan is our product curator and store visionary. Personally vetting every product that comes through the door, she evaluates thousands of items each month with a focus on quality ingredients and value. Well-schooled in the supplements department and the editor of our in-store newsletters, she still insists her main job is raising three daughters! (Wichita, Kansas)

Author


Megan is our product curator and store visionary. Personally vetting every product that comes through the door, she evaluates thousands of items each month with a focus on quality ingredients and value. Well-schooled in the supplements department and the editor of our in-store newsletters, she still insists her main job is raising three daughters! (Wichita, Kansas)

Megan is our product curator and store visionary. Personally vetting every product that comes through the door, she evaluates thousands of items each month with a focus on quality ingredients and value. Well-schooled in the supplements department and the editor of our in-store newsletters, she still insists her main job is raising three daughters! (Wichita, Kansas)

All Eureka Market Education Guides are intended for educational purposes only. The guides are NOT intended to substitute for professional medical consultation and as such, do not diagnose, prescribe or offer personal medical advice. Always consult with your health care professional before taking supplements with prescription medications.


All Eureka Market Education Guides are intended for educational purposes only. The guides are NOT intended to substitute for professional medical consultation and as such, do not diagnose, prescribe or offer personal medical advice. Always consult with your health care professional before taking supplements with prescription medications.

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